Economics


There Are No Excuses Now For A Failure To Reduce Migration

The triggering of Article 50 last week was a major step towards honouring the referendum result. It will undoubtedly please the 69% of the public who say they want Brexit to go ahead (YouGov poll, March 2017) Yet the mass-migration lobby continues to make unconvincing assertions about the risk of economic damage if free movement […]

Claim That Reducing Low-skilled Migration Would Harm Economy Not Backed Up By The Facts

A recent Economist article (‘Keep Out: Lower immigration could be the biggest economic cost of Brexit’, 25th February 2017) makes a number of bogus claims about both the impact of immigration and the public’s response to it that deserve to be soundly rebutted. The article starts by suggesting that net migration into the UK is […]

Migration Watch Uk Response To Tuc Touchstone Blog

Following the publication of a Migration Watch UK paper detailing the implications of Single Market membership for levels of net migration from the EU, a blog post was published on the TUC run Touchstone blog (see here). The main thrust of our paper (which you can read here) was that Single Market membership, which would […]

National Institute For Economic And Social Research Fails To Convince With Assertion That Reducing Migration Would Lead To Slower Growth

A new paper published by the National Institute for Economic and Social Research (NIESR) claims that reducing migration to the UK would result in slower growth for the UK economy with a key driver being the impact lower migration would have on productivity. However, given that prospective post-Brexit restrictions on migration would likely restrict the […]

8th December 2016 (Economics, Employment, European Union)

Sensible Controls On Eu Free Movement Could Well Be A Fiscal Benefit For The Uk

Migration Watch UK response to Treasury Select Committee Chairman Rt. Hon. Andrew Tyrie MP writing for Open Europe The Rt Hon. Andrew Tyrie MP writes for Open Europe (see full report here) that the Government needs to state clearly that stronger controls on free movement “may also carry an economic and fiscal cost for the UK, […]

5th September 2016 (Economics, European Union, Policy)

Update On The Fiscal Impact Of Immigration

1. Professors Dustmann and Frattini from the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration at University College, London have commented (see here) on our paper on the Fiscal Impact of Immigration to the UK published earlier this year (see here). 2. This blog picks up on their key points 3. They note: MW [Migration Watch] […]

30th August 2016 (Economics, Policy)

Social Market Foundation Report Based On Highly Questionable Assumptions

A new report from the Social Market Foundation suggests that an economic slowdown following the UK’s decision to leave the European Union will lead to a slowing of migration – perhaps to the tens of thousands – without requiring the imposition of any actual controls on migration. Any such conclusion is thoroughly unsound, relying on […]

Are Migrants An Economic Benefit To The Uk?

1. Overall, migrants in the UK have been, and continue to be, a net fiscal cost to the UK Exchequer. Only recent migrants from the EU14 have made a net positive fiscal contribution. Immigration has not been shown to have any significant impact, either positive or negative, on GDP per capita, a key measure of […]

Response To Comments On Our Report On The Fiscal Impact Of Immigration

Has Migration Watch UK “distorted UCL research”? Not at all.  This can only be based on a misunderstanding or misreading of our paper. UCL/CReAM calculated a scenario in which business taxes were shared out as an equal cost among everyone in the UK including even the most recent arrivals, and  a scenario in which they […]

17th May 2016 (Economics, European Union)

The Prospects For Eu Enlargement

Summary 1. The European Union (EU) has grown from six original member states to its current size of 28. The biggest enlargement occurred in 2004 when eight East European countries plus Cyprus and Malta joined. There are currently seven countries at various stages in the accession process, although two are yet to be granted candidate […]

1 2 3 11

Subscribe

Enter your Email:

Powered by FeedBlitz