Economics


Are Migrants An Economic Benefit To The Uk?

1. Overall, migrants in the UK have been, and continue to be, a net fiscal cost to the UK Exchequer. Only recent migrants from the EU14 have made a net positive fiscal contribution. Immigration has not been shown to have any significant impact, either positive or negative, on GDP per capita, a key measure of […]

Response To Comments On Our Report On The Fiscal Impact Of Immigration

Has Migration Watch UK “distorted UCL research”? Not at all.  This can only be based on a misunderstanding or misreading of our paper. UCL/CReAM calculated a scenario in which business taxes were shared out as an equal cost among everyone in the UK including even the most recent arrivals, and  a scenario in which they […]

17th May 2016 (Economics, European Union)

The Prospects For Eu Enlargement

Summary 1. The European Union (EU) has grown from six original member states to its current size of 28. The biggest enlargement occurred in 2004 when eight East European countries plus Cyprus and Malta joined. There are currently seven countries at various stages in the accession process, although two are yet to be granted candidate […]

Productivity And Migration – A Brief Overview

There is no doubt that productivity growth – by all conventional measures – took a considerable hit in the recession from which it has not recovered. The failure of productivity growth to return to previous levels stands in stark contrast to previous recessions. Despite a variety of factors being suggested as explaining parts of the […]

13th April 2016 (Economics, Employment)

The Immigration Aspects Of The Eu-canada Economic And Trade Agreement

Summary 1. An agreement with the EU on the lines of the EU Canada Treaty would not increase permanent immigration to the UK. The agreement with Canada explicitly states that it does not cover job-seekers, employment on a permanent basis, residence or measures regarding citizenship[i]. It makes provision for the temporary transfer of specialists. Detail […]

Bank Of England Report Finds Migration Negatively Impacts The Wages Of Lowest-paid Workers In Britain

A recent study by the Bank of England has found that increasing migration has driven down wages especially in sectors already experiencing low pay, such as catering, hotels and social care. This follows Bank of England Governor Mark Carney’s warning in May that the current inflow of foreign workers was holding down wages. There has […]

23rd December 2015 (Economics, Employment)

The Wages Of Millions Of British Workers Affected By Immigration

Commenting on the latest Bank of England research on the impact of immigration on wages, Lord Green of Deddington said:   “For many years the immigration lobby have claimed that there is no evidence that immigration has any significant effect on the wages of British workers.  This new research by the Bank of England blows their […]

21st December 2015 (Current Affairs, Economics, Employment)

Migration Watch Comment On Civitas Pamphlet On Immigration

This authoritative report from Professor Rowthorn, Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of Cambridge, concludes that there is no economic argument, or indeed any other argument for mass immigration on the present scale, currently a third of a million per year. Commenting, Lord Green of Deddington, Chairman of Migration Watch UK said:  “This landmark […]

The Impact Of Immigration On Uk Wage Levels

Summary 1. Immigration may well have some effect in reducing wages and may also hold them back from rising. Detail 2. A summary of the rather limited academic research base for the impact of migration on wages of the UK-born is contained in Annex A together with links to each of the papers or where […]

7th October 2015 (Economics, Employment)

Response To House Of Commons Library Blog On Our Paper On Economic Characteristics Of Migrants In The Uk

Steven Ayres, a researcher at the House of Commons has blogged on our report “Economic characteristics of migrants in the UK in 2014”. His blog starts by noting that its purpose is not to critique “the report itself, but rather to investigate whether the source of the data, the Labour Force Survey (LFS), is capable of […]

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